About Tennis Injuries

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It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using 'Content here, content here', making it look like readable English.

•    One of the most common traumatic tennis injuries
•    Most Probable Cause: Landing on the outside of the foot, with the foot turning too far inwards.
•    The relatively weak ligaments on the outer surface of the ankle are injured.
•     Depending on the severity of the injury, the ligaments may be overstretched or torn, resulting in instability of the ankle.
•    Symptoms: The symptoms are pain and swelling around the ankle, mainly on the outside, later followed by discoloration of the skin.
First Aid: within 48 hrs
•    Rest from play. Do not put weight on the ankle
•    Icing for 15 mins every 3 hrs
•    Application of a compression bandage to contain the swelling
•    Elevate the limb as much as possible
Rehabilitation: 2-5 days from injury
•    As soon as the swelling has subsided the player can begin gentle exercises to improve the normal functioning of the ankle.
•    Do not cross the pain threshold, as this will slow down the healing process.
•    The muscle building phase and return to play must be in conjuction with a sports physiotherapist to ensure complete healing of the ankle.
Prevention Strategies:
It may not always be possible to prevent an ankle sprain but these are some of the steps that can be taken to reduce the chances of injury;
•    A proper musculoskeletal assessment by a trained professional to ascertain any weakness or imbalance in the hip and knee musculature and integrity of the ankle joint.
•    Proper dynamic warm up prior to play and cool down with stretches after play
•    Gradual build up of exercise load to prevent sudden overload
•    Wear firm, stable, well fitting tennis shoes
•    Taping or bracing is very effective in the first month of return to play as it protects the ankle and reduces the risk of re-injury.
 

•    Common overuse injury affecting the dominant hand of the player.
•    Most Probable Cause: Due to impact on rotator cuff tendons causing sharp pain in overhead activities.
•    Symptoms:  Pain around the shoulder, often at the outer portion of the upper arm. The pain is worse with activities such as throwing, delivering the ball.
First Aid: within 48 hrs
•    Rest from play
•    Icing to reduce the inflammation
•    Sometimes anti inflammatory medication may be prescribed depending on severity.
Rehabilitation:
•    Important to start an exercise programme monitored by a Sports physician or a Sports Physiotherapist and to treat the cause of the impingement.
•    Recovery begins with establishing good joint mechanics with gentle mobilizing exercises and then strengthening the weakened musculature with resistance tubing.
Prevention:
•    A musculoskeletal assessment to ascertain muscle imbalance between the shoulder movers and the stabilizers. Inflexibility of the muscles increases the chances of this injury.
•    Proper warm up of the key shoulder muscles prior to play and stretching the shoulder after play
•    Preventative shoulder muscle exercises of the shoulder stabilizers taught by a trained strength coach or a sports physiotherapist
•    Avoid playing too many games in too short a period as fatigue plays an important role in this kind of injury.

•    Also called MTSS (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome) or Periostitis
•    An overuse injury of the lower leg.
•    Most Probable Cause: Overuse of the lower leg muscles (calf, posterior tibial and flexor muscles of the toes). These muscles are important in maintaining your balance during standing, running and jumping
•    Symptoms: Sharp pain, usually on the upper 2/3rd or the lower 1/3rd of the shin(tibia). The pain often affects both legs and gets worse when playing, jumping, sprinting or jogging. Initially the pain improves after a good warm up but it then returns during exercise and persists after exercise.
First Aid: within 48 hrs
•    If exercising, switch to non weight bearing exercise, stop playing on hard surfaces till pain subsides
•    Pain on walking is an indicator to stop playing altogether.
•    Ice application for 15 minutes every 3 hours, direct massage with the ice cube along the bone helps to decrease inflammation.
•    The footwear must be changed if worn out.
Rehabilitation:
•    Do not train with pain as it delays recovery.
•    Rehabilitation takes place in phases:  from improving normal function to strengthening the calf muscles (especially tibialis posterior) and finally return to play.
•    Athlete must be trained to regain static and dynamic balance.
•    Begin by playing on softer surfaces.
•    Footwork drills with small steps ensuring positioning the feet well without loading the shin are important.
Prevention:
•    A detailed musculoskeletal assessment to check for any calf, knee and hip muscle inflexibility or weakness.
•    Performing a thorough warm-up before every training session or match – including stretching exercises for the calf muscles.
•    You can use massage to help the recovery of the deep calf muscles after heavy training or matches. Do not use friction massage on the shinbone itself.
•    Wear properly fitting shoes while playing, and properly fitting trainers when working out.
Note: If you have any (moderate) foot deformity, such as flat foot or high arches, you may need to wear special shoe inserts (orthotics). Please get in touch with Sporting Ethos to get your custom-made inserts.
 

•    Most Common Symptom: Pain on the outer part of elbow while gripping.
•    Most common in Batsmen, pain on outer part of elbow, pain increases on gripping the handle of bat, or while playing a shot.
First Aid: within 48 hrs
•    Rest from play
•    Icing to reduce the inflammation
•    Sometimes anti inflammatory medication may be prescribed by depending on severity.
Rehabilitation:
•    Important to start an exercise program monitored by a Sports Physician or a Sports Physiotherapist and to treat the cause of the impingement.
•    Recovery begins with establishing good joint mechanics with gentle mobilizing exercises and then strengthening the weakened musculature with resistance tubing.
Prevention:
•    Proper warm up of the key elbow muscles prior to play and stretching the wrist and elbow joint after play.
•    Strengthening of wrist extensors with resistance tubing and stretching of the same muscles to maintain the normal range.
 

•    Also know as Patella Tendinopathy
•     An overuse injury of the patella tendon due to the explosive muscular contractions needed for sprinting, jumping, and quick changes of direction during tennis.
•    Most probable causes: poor flexibility of the quadriceps (thigh muscles), hamstrings and variations in leg and foot type (knock knees, bow legs, flat feet etc.)
•    Symptoms:  Sharp pain in the tendon below the knee cap which is present during jumping, sprinting, serving and change of direction after running wide to reach a ball. Often there is an aching pain after finishing playing tennis.
First Aid
•    Rest from jumping and sprinting
•    Ice application for ten minutes every 3 hours
•    If pain persists referral to a sports physician or a physiotherapist is recommended
Rehabilitation
•    Stretching the quadriceps and hamstrings
•    Balance, coordination and stability of the knee must be retrained.
•    Strengthening the quadriceps with static exercises and progress to closed chain exercises and eccentric training.
Prevention Strategies
•    Wear well fitting and comfortable footwear
•    Check for any foot anomalies (flat feet, high arches)
•    Strengthening the hip and knee musculature and getting rid of muscle imbalances.