Injuries

About Golf Injuries

It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using 'Content here, content here', making it look like readable English.

It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using 'Content here, content here', making it look like readable English.

The lower back is the most commonly and frequently injured area of the body in amateur and professional golfers.
Mechanism of Injury
•    The modern swing uses a large shoulder turn but restricts the hip turn to build torque in the muscles of the lower back and shoulders (to provide greater accuracy or distance).
•     This increased rotation coupled with weak and poorly activated core musculature can lead to a lower back injury.
•     It has also been postulated that the body position of the follow-through and the eccentric contraction displayed by decelerating torso are contributing factors to the development of the injury
Symptoms
•    Can vary from a mild ache to severe spasm in the lower back.
•     Common symptoms are a sudden, sharp, persistent or dull pain in the lower back, sometimes on one side only, that worsens with movement.
•    Prolonged standing, sitting, or running may also provoke pain. The pain may radiate to the hips, buttocks, or back of the thigh.
First Aid
•    Rest from activity, ice is recommended
•    If the pain persists or is accompanied by other symptoms, such as shooting pain in the leg extending as far as the foot, a tingling sensation, numbness or loss of strength, you are advised to consult our (sports) physician or Sports Physiotherapist.
Rehabilitation
•    As soon as the acute pain subsides some stretches to ease out the lower back can be started.
•    The anterior and posterior trunk muscles stabilize the spine, and improving the function of these muscle groups is an important part of any low back rehabilitation program.
•    Strengthening the core and back muscles (multifidi) and stretching the lumbar erectors is important.
Prevention Strategies
•    A golf-specific spinal and postural screening is a must. The physiotherapist can identify skeletal and muscle imbalances and give you exercises to improve your posture.
•    Correct posture and muscle balance will enable you to get into the positions required to swing the golf club properly.
•    Correcting the faulty swing mechanics with video motion capture
•    Dynamic warm up before play and cool down after play are recommended.

Golf causes significant injury to the wrist and hand including fractures, tendonopathy and nerve injuries. About a third of the female professional golfers suffer from wrist tendon inflammation.
A wrist Injury may be either acute (due to sudden impact) or chronic (due to overuse)
Some of the common wrist injuries are;
•    Tendonopathy of the wrist ( De quervains) or trigger finger
•    Wrist impaction
•    Carpal tunnel syndrome
•    Fracture of the hammate
•    Most Probable Causes of Tendinopathy: Due to poor swing mechanics, poor stability of the shoulder girdle muscles or due to miss hits.
•    Symptoms: Sharp (acute injury) or dull (overuse), inflammation, restriction in the range of movement of the wrist
First Aid
•    Rest from activity, ice is recommended
•    If the pain persists or is accompanied by other symptoms, such as shooting pain in the leg extending as far as the foot, a tingling sensation, numbness or loss of strength, consult our Sports Physician or Physiotherapist.
Rehabilitation
•    Strengthening the shoulder girdle muscles to improve scapular stability
•    Stretching the forearm flexors and extensors
•    Strengthening the forearm muscles
Prevention Strategies
•    Modification of equipment or technique after appropriate assessment and clinical treatment (if needed)
•    Use of oversized grips that are generally larger and softer. These grips should be replaced every 40 to 50 rounds to reduce slipping.
•    Use of Correctly fitted golf clubs have the butt end of the club handle extend approximately 1 inch beyond the hypothenar eminence of the left hand.
•    Reduction of the grip pressure at address and avoiding using the strong grip position by rotating the left hand counterclockwise.
Proper warm up by shadow swings will help prevent wrist trauma.
 

•    Elbow injuries account for 25–33% of all injuries in amateurs and 7–10% of all injuries in professionals.
•    Lateral elbow injuries (Tennis elbow) are more common, at a rate of 5:1 when compared to medial elbow injuries (Golfer's elbow).
•    Female golfers are more susceptible to these injuries.
Medial epicondylitis or golf elbow
•    Most Probable Causes:
o    Sudden deceleration of the club head, leading to an increased loading of the medial elbow. This can be due to hitting obscured rocks and tree roots.
o    In professionals trying to hit repeatedly out of long and thick rough.
o    In amateurs it occurs due to hitting it ‘fat’.
•    Signs and Symptoms: Pain and tenderness which may be often aggravated by resisted forearm flexion and forearm pronation.
Lateral epicondylitis or tennis elbow
•    Injury at the insertion of the wrist/hand extensors into the lateral epicondyle is most likely due to overuse.
•    Most Probable Causes: Gripping the club too tightly during the swing or changes to the grip with subsequent practice due to fatigue
•    Symptoms: Pain and tenderness which  may be often aggravated by resisted forearm extension and on occasions gripping objects or shaking hands.
First Aid
•    Rest, splinting and icing as soon as pain is felt.
•    Slow your golf swing so that there will be less shock in the arm when the ball is hit.
Rehabilitation
•    Strengthening the forearm flexors and extensors with squash ball squeeze exercises.
•    Wrist curls and reverse curls help in strengthening the forearm flexors and extensors respectively.
Prevention Strategies
•    Altering swing mechanics that cause lesser impact to the small joints
•    Slow your golf swing so that there will be less shock in the arm when the ball is hit.
•    Proper warm up and cool down schedules are a must.
 

•    The shoulder goes through a large range during the golf swing including a large degree of left shoulder movement (for a right handed golfer) and right shoulder external rotation in the backswing.
•    Excessive practice can produce problems of the shoulder due to overuse.
•    Shoulder Impingement is seen in the trail arm (right arm for a right handed player)
•    Acromio clavicular (AC) strain is more common in the lead arm.
Symptoms
Pain around the shoulder often at the outer portion of the upper arm. There may be an aching pain after play.
First Aid: within 48 hrs
•    Rest from play
•    Icing to reduce the inflammation
•    Sometimes anti inflammatory medication may be prescribed depending on severity.
Rehabilitation:
•    Important to start an exercise programme monitored by a Sports physician or a Sports Physiotherapist
•    Recovery begins with establishing good joint mechanics with gentle mobilizing exercises and then strengthening the weakened musculature with resistance tubing.
Prevention:
•    A musculoskeletal assessment to ascertain muscle imbalance between the shoulder movers and the stabilizers.
•    Proper warm up of the key shoulder muscles prior to play and stretching the shoulder after play
•    Preventative shoulder muscle exercises of the shoulder stabilizers taught by aour Strength & Conditioning Trainer.
•    Avoid playing too many games in too short a period as fatigue plays an important role in this kind of injury.